Interview with Lauryn Hughes

 

My name is Lauryn Hughes, formerly known as LoMein Moncleir. I have been writing songs, raps, and poetry since the age of 6. By the time I turned 18, I decided to turn my passion of writing into a career. My freshman year of college was when I made the decision that being a singer-songwriter was what I was going to peruse, along with many other passions and talents I have as well. Knowing that our creator, God, is with me and within me, I know there are no limits or boundaries to anything that I want to achieve.

    Lisa : What first got you into music?

I came from a musical family. My parents are national recording artists and musicians. My brother is a singer as well, thriving in Los Angeles, California. Music is just in my blood and it’s something I will never be able to get away from. I have been writing my own songs since I was 6 years old.

 

Lisa : How would you describe the music that you typically create?

I would describe the music that a create unpredictable and vibrant. I am a songwriter so I have the gift of writing to all kinds of instrumentals, not just one specific genre. Therefore, you never know what you’re going to get out of me, except for the fact that whatever you hear is going to be amazing.

Lisa : What is your creative process like?

My creative process is all over the place because I actually don’t like following routines. One day I might write a song, and then I would use the next day or two to rejuvenate myself and soak in the presence of the world around me and the universe to refill my creativity. I try to get in the habit of doing a nonstop, 15 minute writing session everyday, no matter what I’m writing about, just to practice my flow of words and not thinking too much about what I want to say and just write whatever comes. I think it’s important to practice that to prevent writers block. So often we think too much about what we want to speak on or what message we want to get across, it takes away from our natural creativity and it begins to feel forced.

 

Lisa :  Can you tell us a bit about your favorite song and what inspired you to make it?

 

It’s hard for me to choose a favorite song of mine that I’ve written and released because I always try to make each song better than the last. But if I have to choose, I would say SAHARA is my favorite. I wrote that song the first semester of my junior year of college. I remember I was laying down on my bed in my dorm room listening to one of my favorite artists, Burna Boy. His song “Ye” put me in a different type of groove. It was my first time hearing it and sent me into a whole new world of vibrations. I immediately picked up my songbook and pen, because I only write with pens, and I just started flowing what was on my heart.

Lisa : Which famous musicians do you admire?

 

My most admired musicians/artists are Ty Dolla $ign, 070 Shake, Bon Iver, Choker, Kanye West, Drake, Burna Boy, Dram, A$AP Rocky, Frank Ocean, Kari Faux, Chance The Rapper, and myself, LoMein Moncleir to name a few. Most of these artist I named are highly “slept on” and deserve way more recognition.

 

Lisa :  What is the most trouble I’ve ever gotten into?

Wow! That’s federal lol. But I’ve gotten into and OUT of some serious trouble. Let’s just say that.

Lisa : What is the best advice you’ve been given?

 

My mom always tells me, preparation meets opportunity. My grandad, a.k.a “backup”, always tells me to know what you believe and why you believe it. Also, small minds discuss people, average minds discuss events, successful minds discuss ideas. Always remember that.

 

Lisa : What’s next for you?

More songs coming soon! And we’ll see how the universe works.

 

Social Media links :

Instagram 

What do you think?

Lisa

Written by Lisa

Love music and to write about music. Finishing Journalism on Emerson College and enjoying life.

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